TIANQIAO &
CHRISSY CHEN

NEUROSCIENCE
RESEARCH
BUILDING

Virtual Dedication
FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2021
3:00 P.M. PST
Learn More

Event Details

A New Era in the Quest
to Understand the Brain

Program
Virtual Dedication Ceremony
Building Preview Video


Speakers


The program will stream live from this site on Friday, January 29, at 3:00 p.m.

Note: The 2021 Chen Institute Symposium will take place virtually on January 28 and 29, directly preceding the dedication. Learn more about this two-day event and recent advances in global neuroscience research.

About

About the
Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen
Neuroscience Research Building

Located on Moore Walk at the southeast corner of Del Mar Boulevard and Wilson Avenue, the Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Neuroscience Research Building creates an iconic new gateway to the Caltech campus. Its exterior features copper panels and expansive windows that let abundant light into the research spaces inside. The 150,000-square-foot building will serve as headquarters for the Chen Institute for Neuroscience at Caltech and includes a teaching lab and a 150-seat lecture hall. Research facilities include wet, dry, and computational laboratories as well as specialized labs for behavioral testing to minimize observer interference.

Read More

About the
Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen
Institute for Neuroscience

Launched in 2016 and spearheaded by a $115 million gift from visionary philanthropists Tianqiao Chen and Chrissy Luo, the Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Institute for Neuroscience at Caltech has created a unique environment for the study of the brain. The institute reaches across Caltech’s six academic divisions to catalyze a wide-ranging research community that includes neuroscientists and biologists as well as chemists, computer scientists, economists, physicists, social scientists, and engineers.

Read More
X

About the
Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Institute for Neuroscience

Launched in 2016 and spearheaded by a $115 million gift from visionary philanthropists Tianqiao Chen and Chrissy Luo, the Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Institute for Neuroscience at Caltech has created a unique environment for the study of the brain. The institute reaches across Caltech’s six academic divisions to catalyze a wide-ranging research community that includes neuroscientists and biologists as well as chemists, computer scientists, economists, physicists, social scientists, and engineers.

Central to this initiative is an innovative hub for interdisciplinary neuroscience: the Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Neuroscience Research Building. Designed to foster collaborations at the interface between diverse disciplines, the new building will further amplify and extend Caltech’s legacy of impact throughout neuroscience’s many disciplines.

Researchers in the Chen Building will conduct investigations that span a continuum from deciphering the basic biology of the brain to understanding sensation, perception, cognition, emotion, and behavior, in diverse organisms from flies, worms, zebrafish and mice to humans. The goal is transformational advances and innovations that will improve the human condition, from new tools for scientific discovery to new medical treatments.

Speakers

View Bio
Thomas F. Rosenbaum
President, Caltech
Sonja and William Davidow Presidential Chair

Professor of Physics
X
Thomas F. Rosenbaum
President, Caltech
Sonja and William Davidow Presidential Chair

Professor of Physics

Thomas F. Rosenbaum is the ninth president of the California Institute of Technology and Professor of Physics. He is an expert on the quantum mechanical nature of materials, conducting research at Bell Laboratories, IBM Watson Research Center, and the University of Chicago, where he served as Vice President for Research and for Argonne National Laboratory and then provost, before moving to Caltech in 2014. He received his bachelor’s degree in physics with honors from Harvard University and a PhD in physics from Princeton University. He serves on the Board of Governors for Argonne National Laboratory, the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board, as General Member of the Aspen Center for Physics, and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences Los Angeles Program Committee.

View Bio
Chrissy Luo and Tianqiao Chen
Philanthropists and cofounders, Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Institute
X
Chrissy Luo and Tianqiao Chen
Philanthropists and cofounders, Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Institute

Tianqiao Chen and Chrissy Luo founded Shanda Interactive Entertainment Limited in 1999, which became the largest online entertainment developer and publisher in China. The company has since transformed into a global private investment firm. Like many people, the Chens have long been fascinated with scientific and philosophical questions related to the brain and mind. So, in late 2016, the couple established the Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Institute and committed US $1 billion to help advance our fundamental understanding of the brain. Through innovative collaborations with top global universities and research institutions, the institute drives research in three areas: brain discovery, treatment, and development. The Chens’ gift to Caltech represents the Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Institute’s first major partnership at an institution in the United States.

View Bio
Victor Gordo
Mayor of Pasadena
X
Victor Gordo
Mayor of Pasadena

Victor Gordo was elected mayor of Pasadena in November 2020 after serving on city council since 2001.

Mayor Gordo was born in Zacatecas, Mexico and grew up in Pasadena as the oldest of six children, where his mother worked as a seamstress and his father as a restaurant dishwasher and cook. Victor got his first job at age nine delivering the Pasadena Star News which he continued while attending Pasadena High School where he excelled in football, baseball and soccer. He was the first in his family to go to college, first at Pasadena City College and then Azusa Pacific University. He worked his way through college as a waiter and restaurant manager.

After college Victor became Program Director for Pasadena Day One Community Partnership, and later became the field representative for District 5 Councilmember Bill Crowfoot. While working as a field representative, Victor spent 4 to 5 nights a week attending law school at the University of La Verne. He was elected to Pasadena City Council in March 2001 and passed the California Bar exam in July 2001.

During his time on city council, Victor has advocated for economic growth and stability in local business districts, opposed overdevelopment, championed a living wage, fought for improving educational outcomes for children, supported public schools and pushed for increasing government transparency and accountability. In 2007, Victor was selected as city council’s representative on the Rose Bowl Operating Company. In 2009 the board of directors elected him president to oversee the renovation of the Rose Bowl Stadium. Victor served as president for 10 years, the longest tenure as president of RBOC.

Professionally, Victor serves as the General Counsel for the Laborer’s International Union of North America (LIUNA) Local 777. He lives in District 5 with his wife and two children.

View Bio
David J. Anderson
Director, Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Institute for Neuroscience at Caltech
Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Institute for Neuroscience Leadership Chair
Seymour Benzer Professor of Biology
Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
X
David J. Anderson
Director, Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Institute for Neuroscience at Caltech
Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Institute for Neuroscience Leadership Chair
Seymour Benzer Professor of Biology
Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

After more than two decades creating important new knowledge about the development of the brain, David J. Anderson switched tracks. In the early part of the 21st century, he began to focus on the circuitry of the brain underlying emotion—in particular, fear and aggression—using fruit flies and mice as models. What his team finds out could help untangle the influences of nature and nurture upon human behavior and someday may lead to improved drugs for people facing mental health challenges such as depression. Anderson is also committed to science communication; his work has been featured in The New York Times, BBC News, and NPR’s All Things Considered. Anderson received the Edward M. Scolnick Prize in Neuroscience from MIT’s McGovern Institute in 2018, the Thomas Salmon Award from the New York Academy of Medicine in 2017, and the Perl-UNC Neuroscience Prize from the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Medicine in 2016. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2007. He earned his AB from Harvard Summa Cum Laude and his PhD from Rockefeller University, and has been part of Caltech since 1986.

View Bio
Stephen L. Mayo (PhD ’87)
Bren Professor of Biology and Chemistry
X
Stephen L. Mayo (PhD ’88)
Bren Professor of Biology and Chemistry

Stephen L. Mayo has been a member of the Caltech faculty since 1992. He served as vice provost for research from 2007 to 2010 and as chair of the Division of Biology and Biological Engineering from 2010 to 2020. His research focuses on the development of computational approaches to protein engineering, a field that has broad applications ranging from advanced biofuels to human therapeutics. He cofounded: Molecular Simulations Inc. (currently Accelrys), a computational chemistry company; Xencor, a publicly traded biotherapeutics company; and Protabit, a privately held protein engineering company. He was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 2004 for his pioneering contributions in the field of protein design and in March 2013 was appointed by President Obama to the National Science Board. Mayo received his undergraduate degree from the Pennsylvania State University and his PhD from Caltech.

View Bio
Richard M. Murray (BS ’85)
Thomas E. and Doris Everhart Professor of Control and Dynamical Systems and Bioengineering
William K. Bowes Jr. Leadership Chair, Division of Biology and Biological Engineering
X
Richard M. Murray (BS ’85)
Thomas E. and Doris Everhart Professor of Control and Dynamical Systems and Bioengineering
William K. Bowes Jr. Leadership Chair, Division of Biology and Biological Engineering

Richard M. Murray joined the Caltech faculty in 1991, served as chair of the Division of Engineering and Applied Science from 2000 to 2005, directed Caltech's Information Science and Technology initiative from 2006 to 2009, and was named chair of the Division of Biology and Biological Engineering in 2020. Murray’s research explores feedback and control in networked systems, with applications in biology and autonomy. His current projects include novel control system architectures, biomolecular feedback systems, and networked control systems. Murray served as co-chair of the National Research Council Committee on Science Technology and Law (CSTL) Forum on Synthetic Biology from 2013 to 2016, is a founding member of the Engineering Biology Research Consortium, chaired a National Academies consensus study on “Future Biotechnology Products and Opportunities to Enhance Capabilities of the Biotechnology Regulatory System” in 2016–17, and received the 2017 IEEE Control Systems Award for outstanding contributions to control systems engineering, science, or technology. He received his BS from Caltech and a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley.

View Bio
Viviana Gradinaru (BS ’05)
Professor of Nueroscience and Biological Engineering
Director, Center for Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience
HMRI Investigator
X
Viviana Gradinaru (BS ’05)
    Professor of Neuroscience and Biological Engineering
Director, Center for Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience
HMRI Investigator

Viviana Gradinaru studies several aspects of the brain, including circuits for sleep and locomotion and methods of gene delivery to neurons. She has created optogenetic actuators and sensors as well as techniques to render tissues transparent that are used by laboratories worldwide. She also has designed viral vectors that can cross the blood-brain barrier, opening the potential for noninvasive treatment of brain disorders. A few of her recent honors include the Early-Career Scientist Award from Takeda Pharmaceutical Company and the New York Academy of Sciences, the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy’s 2020 Outstanding New Investigator Award, the Vilcek Foundation Prize for Creative Promise in Biomedical Science, and the Society for Neuroscience’s Young Investigator Award. She also received a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers and the National Institutes of Health Director’s Pioneer and New Innovator awards. A Sloan Fellow, Pew Scholar, Moore Inventor, and Vallee Scholar, she has been recognized as a World Economic Forum Young Scientist and as one of Cell’s “40 under 40.” Gradinaru earned a BS at Caltech and a PhD at Stanford University. She joined the Caltech faculty in 2012.

Welcome!

TIANQIAO &
CHRISSY CHEN

NEUROSCIENCE
RESEARCH
BUILDING

Virtual Dedication
FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2021
3:00 P.M. PST

Event Details

A New Era in the Quest
to Understand the Brain

Program
Virtual Dedication Ceremony
Building Preview Video

The program will stream live from this site on Friday, January 29, at 3:00 p.m.

Note: The 2021 Chen Institute Symposium will take place virtually on January 28 and 29, directly preceding the dedication. Learn more about this two-day event and recent advances in global neuroscience research.

About

About the
Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen
Neuroscience Research Building

Located on Moore Walk at the southeast corner of Del Mar Boulevard and Wilson Avenue, the Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Neuroscience Research Building creates an iconic new gateway to the Caltech campus. Its exterior features copper panels and expansive windows that let abundant light into the research spaces inside. The 150,000-square-foot building will serve as headquarters for the Chen Institute for Neuroscience at Caltech and includes a teaching lab and a 150-seat lecture hall. Research facilities include wet, dry, and computational laboratories as well as specialized labs for behavioral testing to minimize observer interference.

Read More

The Chens have commissioned a triptych by artist and neuroscientist Greg Dunn that will anchor the main entrance. From the lobby, a spiral staircase leads up to a two-story atrium and communal spaces on the second and third floors that are illuminated with natural light from a central skylight as well as the windows in the exterior walls.

Beyond the communal areas, an open arrangement places laboratories back to back, with work stations for graduate students aligned along the periphery. Spaces are separated by glass windows and doors. This “transparent” design promotes interdisciplinary collaboration and allows sunlight to infuse the interior from one side of the building to the other. Even the upper basement receives light from windows that look out onto a patio and sunken garden.

Throughout the building, research suites are designed around a framework of generalized components so that they can be modified to accommodate evolving scientific approaches and needs. Similarly, electrical wiring and pipes are exposed and run along the ceilings of common hallways so that science can continue unimpeded while repairs or modifications are made.

To address the intense energy needs of neuroscience research, achieve the highest possible level of sustainability, and ensure continuous operation in the event of local outages, on-site natural gas-fired fuel cells generate resilient primary power for the Chen Building. High-efficiency mechanical, electricity, and plumbing systems with energy recovery also provide long-term energy savings.

The Chen Neuroscience Research Building embodies a new model of laboratory design, one that meets the highly specialized requirements of neuroscience today, can be readily adapted to integrate future technological advances, and fosters the cross-disciplinary collaboration that is essential for unlocking the great mysteries of the brain.

About the
Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen
Institute for Neuroscience

Launched in 2016 and spearheaded by a $115 million gift from visionary philanthropists Tianqiao Chen and Chrissy Luo, the Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Institute for Neuroscience at Caltech has created a unique environment for the study of the brain. The institute reaches across Caltech’s six academic divisions to catalyze a wide-ranging research community that includes neuroscientists and biologists as well as chemists, computer scientists, economists, physicists, social scientists, and engineers.

Read More

Central to this initiative is an innovative hub for interdisciplinary neuroscience: the Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Neuroscience Research Building. Designed to foster collaborations at the interface between diverse disciplines, the new building will further amplify and extend Caltech’s legacy of impact throughout neuroscience’s many disciplines.

Researchers in the Chen Building will conduct investigations that span a continuum from deciphering the basic biology of the brain to understanding sensation, perception, cognition, and human behavior. The goal is transformational advances and innovations that will improve the human condition, from new tools for scientific discovery to new medical treatments.

Speakers

View Bio
Thomas F. Rosenbaum
President, Caltech
Sonja and William Davidow Presidential Chair

Professor of Physics

Thomas F. Rosenbaum is the ninth president of the California Institute of Technology and Professor of Physics. He is an expert on the quantum mechanical nature of materials, conducting research at Bell Laboratories, IBM Watson Research Center, and the University of Chicago, where he served as Vice President for Research and for Argonne National Laboratory and then provost, before moving to Caltech in 2014. He received his bachelor’s degree in physics with honors from Harvard University and a PhD in physics from Princeton University. He serves on the Board of Governors for Argonne National Laboratory, the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board, as General Member of the Aspen Center for Physics, and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences Los Angeles Program Committee.

View Bio
Chrissy Luo and Tianqiao Chen
Philanthropists and cofounders, Tianqiao & Chrissy Chen Institute

Tianqiao Chen and Chrissy Luo founded Shanda Interactive Entertainment Limited in 1999, which became the largest online entertainment developer and publisher in China. The company has since transformed into a global private investment firm. Like many people, the Chens have long been fascinated with scientific and philosophical questions related to the brain and mind. So, in late 2016, the couple established the Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Institute and committed US $1 billion to help advance our fundamental understanding of the brain. Through innovative collaborations with top global universities and research institutions, the institute drives research in three areas: brain discovery, treatment, and development. The Chens’ gift to Caltech represents the Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Institute’s first major partnership at an institution in the United States.

View Bio
Victor Gordo
Mayor of Pasadena

Born in Zacatecas, Mexico, Victor immigrated to the United States with his parents as a young child. The oldest of six, Victor grew up in Pasadena and is a proud product of the Pasadena Unified School District.  Both of his parents worked two jobs. Victor’s father was a dishwasher and cook at Ranchero's Mexican Restaurant for 50 years. His late mother, who died when his youngest brother was four years old, was a seamstress. From age nine until he was 17 years old, Victor delivered the Pasadena Star-News newspaper every day before school and every weekend.

Victor played football, baseball, and soccer at Pasadena High School and received a number of athletic honors including All Pacific League honors and All San Gabriel Valley Ambassadors Co-Athlete of the year. The Pasadena High School faculty awarded him the George Stewart Memorial Scholarship established to “honor the graduating senior whose character, determination, and quiet leadership best reflect the memory of George Stewart.”

When Victor enrolled at Pasadena City College, he became the first person in his family to attend college, continuing his education at Azusa Pacific University, studying business management and finance. Shortly after his mother passed away, Victor was forced to postpone his college dreams to help raise his siblings. As his siblings got older, Victor was able to continue his formal education while still working full-time. He worked his way through school as a waiter and restaurant manager (at the Rose City Diner and at Ranchero’s) to help contribute to his family.

Victor worked as a Program Director for Pasadena’s Day One Community Partnership where he brought together over 100 agencies to create Youth Month, an effort which provided Pasadena young people with free daily activities during the month of August. He also worked closely with City staff and residents to rid neighborhoods of problematic bars and liquor stores. As a result of his efforts with Day One, Victor was asked to work with the Los Angeles County Children’s Planning Council to help develop a system of Service Area Planning Councils aimed at making Los Angeles County government more responsive to local needs, as well as more efficient and effective in delivering services to children, youth, and families.

Victor began his direct service to the City of Pasadena in 1997, when then–Vice Mayor Bill Crowfoot appointed him as the field representative for District 5. Pasadena’s District 5 is one of our City’s most ethnically and socially diverse districts, and includes several of its most important and notable historic landmark districts—Bungalow Heaven, Garfield Heights, Washington Square, and Orange Heights. In his capacity as field representative, Victor successfully handled many types of constituent issues, from problems affecting a small number of residents or businesses to issues of citywide concern.

While working as the field representative for Vice Mayor Crowfoot, Victor undertook the grueling task of attending law school at night, commuting 4-5 nights a week to the University of La Verne College of Law for classes and spending weekends in that institution’s law library in order to compete with students who did not work. He excelled at his studies and graduated with honors one year ahead of his class. Victor passed the California Bar Exam on his first attempt in July, 2001.Following Vice Mayor Crowfoot’s retirement from City service, Victor was elected to represent Pasadena’s District 5 on the Pasadena City Council in March, 2001. In 2009, he was selected by the Pasadena City Council to serve as its representative on the Rose Bowl Operating Company (RBOC) and was its longest-serving President/Chair, leading the Stadium’s successful renovation efforts. Victor has served on the Council’s Finance Committee and as Chair of the Economic Development and Technology Committee of the City Council.

Throughout his time as Councilmember, Victor has focused on fostering an improved quality of life in District 5, promoting safe, family-friendly environments throughout the District and the City as a whole. He advocated for economic growth and stability in local business districts, opposed overdevelopment, championed a living wage, fought for efforts to improve educational outcomes for our children, supported our public schools, and pushed for increasing government transparency and accountability.

Once again, Victor led efforts to combat nuisance liquor stores that were negatively affecting residential neighborhoods, chairing a work group that developed a process for dealing with this issue, which had plagued the City for decades (adopted by the City Council, the Deemed Approved Ordinance withstood legal challenge in 2012). Utilizing the City’s Deemed Approved Ordinance, Victor was successful in ridding the District of two nuisance liquor stores and, more critically, working to replace these nuisance businesses with quality affordable housing.

Professionally, Victor serves as the Business Manager and attorney for the Laborers’ International Union of North America (LIUNA) Local 777. Victor enjoys a wonderful family life in Pasadena’s District 5 with his wife Kelly, an elementary school teacher in the El Monte Unified School District, and their two children— Michael and Emma.

Victor was elected Pasadena’s third Citywide-elected Mayor on November 3, 2020.

View Bio
David J. Anderson
Director, Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Institute for Neuroscience at Caltech
Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Institute for Neuroscience Leadership Chair
Seymour Benzer Professor of Biology
Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

After more than two decades creating important new knowledge about the development of the brain, David J. Anderson switched tracks. In the early part of the 21st century, he began to focus on the circuitry of the brain underlying emotion—in particular, fear and aggression—using fruit flies and mice as models. What his team finds out could help untangle the influences of nature and nurture upon human behavior and someday may lead to improved drugs for people facing mental health challenges such as depression. Anderson is also committed to science communication; his work has been featured in The New York Times, BBC News, and NPR’s All Things Considered. Anderson received the Edward M. Scolnick Prize in Neuroscience from MIT’s McGovern Institute in 2018, the Thomas Salmon Award from the New York Academy of Medicine in 2017, and the Perl-UNC Neuroscience Prize from the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Medicine in 2016. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2007. He earned his AB from Harvard and his PhD from Rockefeller University, and has been part of Caltech since 1986.

View Bio
Stephen L. Mayo (PhD ’88)
Bren Professor of Biology and Chemistry

Stephen L. Mayo has been a member of the Caltech faculty since 1992. He served as vice provost for research from 2007 to 2010 and as chair of the Division of Biology and Biological Engineering from 2010 to 2020. His research focuses on the development of computational approaches to protein engineering, a field that has broad applications ranging from advanced biofuels to human therapeutics. He cofounded: Molecular Simulations Inc. (currently Accelrys), a computational chemistry company; Xencor, a publicly traded biotherapeutics company; and Protabit, a privately held protein engineering company. He was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 2004 for his pioneering contributions in the field of protein design and in March 2013 was appointed by President Obama to the National Science Board. Mayo received his undergraduate degree from the Pennsylvania State University and his PhD from Caltech.

View Bio
Richard M. Murray (BS ’85)
Thomas E. and Doris Everhart Professor of Control and Dynamical Systems and Bioengineering
William K. Bowes Jr. Leadership Chair, Division of Biology and Biological Engineering

Richard M. Murray joined the Caltech faculty in 1991, served as chair of the Division of Engineering and Applied Science from 2000 to 2005, directed Caltech's Information Science and Technology initiative from 2006 to 2009, and was named chair of the Division of Biology and Biological Engineering in 2020. Murray’s research explores feedback and control in networked systems, with applications in biology and autonomy. His current projects include novel control system architectures, biomolecular feedback systems, and networked control systems. Murray served as co-chair of the National Research Council Committee on Science Technology and Law (CSTL) Forum on Synthetic Biology from 2013 to 2016, is a founding member of the Engineering Biology Research Consortium, chaired a National Academies consensus study on “Future Biotechnology Products and Opportunities to Enhance Capabilities of the Biotechnology Regulatory System” in 2016–17, and received the 2017 IEEE Control Systems Award for outstanding contributions to control systems engineering, science, or technology. He received his BS from Caltech and a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley.

View Bio
Viviana Gradinaru (BS ’05)
Director, Center for Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience
Professor of Neuroscience and Biological Engineering
Investigator, Heritage Medical Research Institute

Viviana Gradinaru studies several aspects of the brain, including circuits for sleep and locomotion and methods of gene delivery to neurons. She has created optogenetic actuators and sensors as well as techniques to render tissues transparent that are used by laboratories worldwide. She also has designed viral vectors that can cross the blood-brain barrier, opening the potential for noninvasive treatment of brain disorders. A few of her recent honors include the Early-Career Scientist Award from Takeda Pharmaceutical Company and the New York Academy of Sciences, the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy’s 2020 Outstanding New Investigator Award, the Vilcek Foundation Prize for Creative Promise in Biomedical Science, and the Society for Neuroscience’s Young Investigator Award. She also received a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers and the National Institutes of Health Director’s Pioneer and New Innovator awards. A Sloan Fellow, Pew Scholar, Moore Inventor, and Vallee Scholar, she has been recognized as a World Economic Forum Young Scientist and as one of Cell’s “40 under 40.” Gradinaru earned a BS at Caltech and a PhD at Stanford University. She joined the Caltech faculty in 2012.